Scrollbar preferences

When a lot of output is printed to your terminal screen, it can be helpful to have your terminal behave in a specific manner so that it is easier to work with.

Scrollbar visibility

You can disable the scrollbar:

  1. Open Edit ▸ Preferences.

  2. Your current profile is selected in the sidebar. If you wish to edit a different profile, click on its name.

  3. Select Scrolling.

  4. Uncheck Show scrollbar.

Your preference is saved immediately.

Scroll on output

You can lock scrolling so that it always shows the newest output while a command executes and produces output.

  1. Open Edit ▸ Preferences.

  2. Your current profile is selected in the sidebar. If you wish to edit a different profile, click on its name.

  3. Select Scrolling.

  4. Check Scroll on output.

Scroll on input

You can set the terminal to automatically scroll to the bottom of the window when you input text into the prompt.

  1. Open Edit ▸ Preferences.

  2. Your current profile is selected in the sidebar. If you wish to edit a different profile, click on its name.

  3. Select Scrolling.

  4. Check Scroll on keystroke.

Scrollback lines

You can limit the number of lines of terminal output which are remembered.

  1. Open Edit ▸ Preferences.

  2. Your current profile is selected in the sidebar. If you wish to edit a different profile, click on its name.

  3. Select Scrolling.

  4. Check Limit scrollback to and enter a number of lines to limit scrollback.

  5. Optionally, you can click on + to increase and - to decrease lines.

You can choose to have unlimited scrollback.

  1. Open Edit ▸ Preferences.

  2. Your current profile is selected in the sidebar. If you wish to edit a different profile, click on its name.

  3. Select Scrolling.

  4. Uncheck Limit scrollback to.

Scrollback data is stored in compressed and encrypted files on disk, under the system’s default location for temporary files (usually /tmp). These files are unlinked immediately after their creation, and as such, do not show up in the directory listing. The occupied disk space is freed up as soon as the corresponding terminal closes.

Make sure you have sufficient disk space available for these temporary files. If in doubt, monitor disk usage for example with the command du /tmp.

A giant scrollback buffer makes resizing the terminal window slower. As a rule of thumb, resizing gets noticeably slow at around 1 million lines.